Do you know what your Filler or Crutch words are????

Fillers or Crutch Words

Fillers/ Crutch words are useless words and sounds that continuously creeping into people’s speech.
Fillers words range from repetitious sounds, such as “uh”, “um”, “like” and “ahhh” and more. They also include favourite catch words and phrases, such as; “you know”, “anyway”, “just”, “all right” and “like”.

The problem with using fillers such as these when you speak is that they distract your listener. Fillers weaken our phrases.

The Benefits of Eliminating Fillers

Eliminating crutch words is one of the fastest ways to improve you as a speaker. As your speech fillers decrease, your listeners will: form a better impression of you as you speak and be able to easily digest what you say.

Your audience will be better able to focus on the message you’re communicating, rather than being distracted by the way you’re expressing yourself.

Not only does it display confidence to your audience, but also you become easier to understand as your message gets across.

Here’s what to do to reduce the use of crutch words:

The best way to find what your filler words are is to have some one record you the next time you speak. Then have a watch…you will be able to see what your crutch words or statements are.

Ahhh, ummm, So then, But etc. You may find out that you have more than 1 crutch word. Knowing what your crutch word(s) are is the first step to removing them from your speech.

Now that you are aware of them be intentional about removing them when you talk. A few ways to do that is to;

i) Pause every time you are about to say your crutch word
ii) Breathe in before your crutch word escapes your mouth.

Ideally you want to replace your crutch word, with one of the two strategies above.

It’s time to say good bye to crutch words for good.

#‎StayAmazing

Karen D#

The Art of Story Telling

Storytelling can be and is a really effective tool when speaking.

As adults, stories still have that magic and power over us as we did when we were kids.

Why is it that we forget this when we have to give a business presentation?

Don’t we want to engage our audiences?

For some reason, we think that our business audience only wants to hear the facts and figures.

I have to say – that is so not how it works.

Our audiences want to be engaged and intrigued and really -who doesn’t like a good story? That’s right we all do.

Here’s a tid bit on how to use stories during any presentation.

When deciding which story to tell make sure that you have considered your audience, find the right story to illustrate your point. Remember how your parents read great stories to you or shared stories about their childhood experience? It’s time for you to do the same.

Remember the story which I’m almost sure your parents shared with you; I had to walk 8 miles to school each way, every day! lol

When you tell a story with energy, passion and excitement, people are eager to tune in to every word that exits your mouth because they want to hear what happens in the end.

When you illustrate your key point with a story, it almost guarantees that your audience will remember your message.

As humans we are hard wired to receive and register stories at a sub-conscious level.

So no mater what your topic or who’s in your audience, include the art of storytelling…. if your goal is to connect, engage and be memorable.

Stay Amazing!

Karen D

The Science Of Remembering Names

If you are anything like was about 18 months ago, I was the worlds worst rememberer of names (Yes I know this is a bad sentence…but so what – keep reading)

I have to tell you, I never used to be the greatest at remembering names, but now I am 10x better than where I used to be. Here are a few strategies to help you have better success at “remembering names”.

Step I)
Know that remembering names is a skill and you have to intentionally commit to improve at this skill.

Step II)
What you say will materialize. Make a deliberate conscious decision to never again say, “I’m horrible at remembering names”. Get rid of this this self-limiting mindset. Declare what’s possible, for example; “I easily remember names”.

Step III)
Practice, practice again and practice some more. Begin today and use the tips below to learn the names of at least five people. Add one or two to your list every day. The memory muscle grows only with practice.

Try these techniques to help you remember others’ names effectively.

1. Focus on the person. The instant you meet another person, give them your undivided attention. Be fully present, fully face them, look them in the eye and actively listen. Don’t allow yourself to become distracted, and don’t let yourself off the hook by blaming a bad memory. Forgetting names is most often caused by lack of focus and effort.

2. Repeat their name out loud. As soon as you hear their name, immediately repeat their name out loud. By saying the person’s name at least 3 times in the conversation, you engrave their name in your memory.

3. End the interaction by saying their name. As your conversation draws to a close, be sure to say the person’s name one last time, “It was great to meet you, Sam”.

Remembering names is more than chivalry, we all want to feel important, valued and remembered.

“If you want to win friends, make it a point to remember them.
If you remember my name, you pay me a subtle compliment;
you indicate that I have made an impression on you.
Remember my name and you add to my feeling of importance.”
–Dale Carnegie

So use the tips above to easily remember names, create rapport and build a meaningful relationships.

Karen D

Your Belief System Has Everything To Do With Being A Kick Ass Speaker

“You are indeed what you think about all day long”.

This statement is especially true when it comes to public speaking.

As humans we all have this preconceived belief about the things we can do and the things we cannot do.

Once again… “PRECONCEIVED beliefs”.

I often hear people say “Oh…I am such a horrible speaker”, and when I ask them how many times they’ve presented in front of a large group many say “Well… never, or once or twice”.

How can you assume that you are not good at something even before trying it or after trying it once or twice?

Were you a pro driver after the first try, could you quickly tie your shoelace after the first try, so why in heavens name do you believe and expect that by not trying at all or by trying a couple of times you will be amazing at it?
When you change these self – sabotaging beliefs you are holding in your mind, you can accomplish anything you desire and in this case you can and will become a great speaker ONLY when you believe you can.

Karen D